Why You Should Take Aspirin If You’re Having a Heart Attack

Heart Attack
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When most people think about heart attacks, they imagine a middle-aged man clutching his chest and gasping for breath. But the truth is, heart attacks can happen to anyone, at any age. And if you’re unlucky enough to have a heart attack, taking aspirin could save your life.

Aspirin is an anti-inflammatory drug that has been shown to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes. It works by preventing blood clots from forming, which can block the flow of blood to the heart and brain.

In this article, we’ll explore the evidence behind taking aspirin during a heart attack, as well as the risks and side effects.

When to take aspirin during a heart attack

If you think you’re having a heart attack, the first thing you should do is call an emergency. Then, chew and swallow a regular-strength aspirin tablet (325 mg), unless you’re allergic to aspirin or have been told by your doctor not to take it.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that people who think they’re having a heart attack should take an aspirin as soon as possible. This is because the earlier you take aspirin, the more effective it is at reducing the risk of death and disability.

What does the evidence say?

There have been many studies on the benefits of taking aspirin during a heart attack. In one large study of over 13,000 heart attack survivors, those who took aspirin within 24 hours of their attack were 22% less likely to die from any cause over the next four weeks, compared to those who didn’t take aspirin.

Another study looked at the effects of taking aspirin within 6 hours of a heart attack. This research showed that aspirin reduced the risk of death from any cause by almost a quarter (24%), and the risk of dying from heart-related causes by a third (33%).

These studies suggest that taking aspirin as soon as possible after the start of a heart attack could save your life.

Aspirin as Blood Thinner

In addition to its anti-inflammatory effects, aspirin also acts as a blood thinner. This means it can help prevent blood clots from forming.

Blood clots are a major cause of heart attacks and strokes. When a blood clot forms in an artery that supplies blood to the heart, it can cause a heart attack. And when a clot forms in an artery that supplies blood to the brain, it can cause a stroke.

Aspirin works by inhibiting the production of thromboxane, a substance that promotes clotting. By preventing blood clots from forming, aspirin reduces the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

There is strong evidence to support the use of aspirin as a blood thinner. In one study of over 22,000 people who had had a heart attack or stroke, those who took aspirin were 21% less likely to die from any cause over the next four years, compared to those who didn’t take aspirin.

Aspirin also reduces the risk of recurrent heart attacks and strokes. In one study, people who had previously had a heart attack or stroke were 20% less likely to have another event if they took aspirin, compared to those who didn’t take aspirin.

Aspirin is most effective when taken at a dose of 75-100 mg per day. However, lower doses (75 mg per day) are just as effective as higher doses (325 mg per day) in preventing recurrent heart attacks and strokes.

What are the risks and side effects of taking aspirin?

Aspirin is generally safe, but it can cause side effects such as stomach pain and bleeding. These side effects are more common when aspirin is taken at higher doses or on an empty stomach.

If you’re allergic to aspirin, you should not take it. And if you have a history of gastrointestinal bleeding or ulcers, you should speak to your doctor before taking aspirin, as it may increase your risk of bleeding.

Consult Your Doctor

You can consult a Cardiologist in Lahore or the Best Cardiologist in rawalpindi for the treatment of the heart.

 

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