Knowing The Right Measurements of Wheelchair Ramp

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Do you want to construct your personal ramp but still want to ensure that it is safe? 

Good! Each and every wheelchair ramp must be secure. In reality, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has requirements in place to ensure that wheelchairs, ramps, and paths are safe.

The wheelchair ramp incline is one of the most important safety features. 

Continue reading to discover more about this crucial metric.

 

Getting to Know Slope

The design of a wheelchair ramp takes a lot of thought. They must allow adequate room and leeway for the wheelchair to maneuver up and around turns on the ramp. They must assure that the shift from the ramp to the landing is as smooth as possible.

They must also create a slope that is controllable. The slope is defined as the proportion of rise to run if you recall your maths. A 5:5 slope, for example, is a ramp that is five inches tall (rise) and five inches long (run).

Slope can be stated as a percentage, such as X units of rising for every 100 units of run. A 36-inch increase over a 100-inch length, for example, is a 36 percent slope.

Slope can alternatively be given in degrees, which is calculated by dividing the inverse tangent of the climb by the run relative to horizontal.

Let’s keep things simple and discuss simple ramp slope ratios.

 

Calculating the Slope of a Wheelchair Ramp

There isn’t much to compute in reality. The ADA gives clear guidance on wheelchair ramp slope ratios.

The slope requirement for commercial and public facilities is 1:12 (in inches), or around 5 degrees of elevation. This slope can be calculated using a slope calculator

The ratio can be as sharp as 3:12, or nearly 15 degrees, for individuals building ramps at home. This is handy when space is at a premium, but motorized wheelchairs may find it challenging to manoeuvre.

A 2:12 ratio, or around 10 degrees of incline, is a good compromise for ramps at home.

A 2:12 ratio is not too difficult for wheelchair users, and it reduces the width of the ramp by half.

 

The Implications for Ramp Design

The effects of determining slope on-ramp construction for a handicapped-accessible home are substantial. A straight run is not possible for every wheelchair ramp.

This is due to the fact that there is no prescribed height for a home’s landing. A wheelchair ramp slope may need to reach a height of 24 inches, or it may need to reach a height of 44 inches.

Every house is unique. The ramp is a one-of-a-kind creation.

Ramps must also be convenient to use from the floor and have enough room at the landing. An angled or switchback design is used in many at-home wheelchair ramps.

 

In addition to the above information, learn how to properly construct a wheelchair ramp by taking the following measurements:

  • Hand-propelled wheelchair ramps should have a maximum slope of 1″ every 12″ of length (4.8-degree angle; 8.3 percent grade).
  • Power chairs should have a maximum slope of 1.5″ rise to 12″ length (7.1-degree angle; 12.5 percent grade).
  • The minimum width (inside rails) should be 36″ – (48″ is ideal).
  • In the event of an emergency, buildings that have been adapted for accessibility should have at least two remotely placed accessible exits.
  • In the event of an emergency, buildings that have been adapted for accessibility should have at least two remotely placed accessible exits.
  • Carborundum grit, strips, rubber, sand placed on wet paint, or rough (“broom finish”) concrete are all acceptable slip-resistant surfaces.
  • To provide enough stopping distance, ramps should have a 5′ straight and level surface at the bottom.

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