Coordinate Plane

Points of Coordinate Plane
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A two-dimensional plane that is formed by the intersection of the horizontal axis and vertical axis is known as the coordinate plane. The horizontal axis signifies the movement from left to right or right to left. Likewise, the vertical axis signifies the movement from top to bottom or vice versa. A horizontal axis is also known as the x-axis and a vertical axis is referred to as the y-axis. A coordinate plane is used as a map as it yields precise and accurate directions.

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Points of Coordinate Plane

To recall, a coordinate plane is a plane that is formed by the intersection of the horizontal and vertical axis. The following points are:

  1.  The first quadrant of the coordinate plane is represented with the help of Roman numerals ‘I’. The first quadrant is positive. Thus, it is written as (+, +).
  2.  The second quadrant of the coordinate plane is represented with the help of Roman numerals ‘II’. The second quadrant is positive and negative. Thus, it is written as (-, + ).
  3.  The third quadrant is expressed via the roman number ‘III’. It is a positive and negative quadrant. Thus, it is written as ( +, -).
  4.  The fourth quadrant is a negative quadrant which is expressed by the roman numerals IV. It is written as (-, -).

Vector Quantity

A geometrical entity that has both direction and magnitude can be defined as a vector quantity. For example, velocity. It is the rate of change in the position of an object concerning the time frame given. Likewise, acceleration is also considered a vector quantity as it comprises both direction and magnitude. Vectors have both initial and terminal points. Based on these two attributes( magnitude and direction) a vector is classified into various types. Some of them are zero vector, co-orthogonal vector, parallel vector, and so on. When two vectors have the same direction but not equivalent magnitude, then a vector is known as a parallel vector. Likewise, a vector with 0 magnitudes is known as a parallel vector.

Scalar Quantity Vs Vector Quantity

The differences between a vector and a scalar quantity are:

  1. The physical quantities which are not composed of any direction are known as the scalar quantity whereas the physical quantities which are composed of both direction and magnitude are known as the vector quantities.
  2. Scalar quantities are often regarded as the real number with some measurement. A type of number except the complex number is known as a real number. On the other hand, a vector quantity is made up of direction and magnitude.
  3. Examples of scalar quantity: are distance, speed, time, and many others.
    Examples of vector Quantity: force, displacement, velocity, acceleration, etc.
  4.  Common Fact: The arithmetic operations of addition, multiplication, division, and subtraction are applicable for both scalar quantities and vector quantities.

Applications of Vector Quantity

To recall, a physical quantity that consists of both magnitude and direction is known as a vector quantity. These quantities are used in the fields of mathematics and physics. Some applications of vector quantities are:

  1. Vectors play a very vital role in the study of differential geometry and differential equations.
  2. The vector is used in the fields of physics, mathematics, engineering, electromagnetic induction, fluid law, and many others.

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